Syringe with biohazard background

They Aren’t All Safe: Pharma Is Willing to Look “Unscientific” to Sell Vaccines

Why do progressive news sites that expose government and corporate disinformation in other areas accept disinformation when it comes to vaccines–actually calling activists “unscientific”?

January 26, 2017 | Source: Counter Punch | by Martha Rosenberg

Why do progressive news sites that expose government and corporate disinformation in other areas accept disinformation when it comes to vaccines–actually calling activists “unscientific”?

It is not surprising mainstream scientists are vaccine absolutists who vilify “anti-vaxxers” given that their medical centers, hospital wings, universities and sometimes personal paychecks are funded by Pharma. (The motive of progressive sites is less clear.) But “Pharma knows best” rings false with a quick look at withdrawn drugs like Vioxx, Bextra, Baycol, Trovan, Meridia, Darvon, Phen-Fen, Raxar and Seldane–all called safe when they were making millions.

Neither mainstream or progressive news sites want to acknowledge the existence of the federal National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) which, since 1988, has settled more than 16,000 claims and awarded $3.18 billion in injury settlements. When I asked a vaccine expert why the court existed if vaccines are unremittingly safe he told me that vaccines are so basic to public health yet so non-lucrative (compared to billion dollar pills), the government does not want vaccine makers bankrupted by lawsuits.

But ignoring the court and the ghastly injuries it settles—I was told, off the record, about a woman who lost her fingers and toes from vasculitis caused by a vaccine—mainstream scientists are the ones who are “unscientific.”  The truth is not all vaccines are safe, life-saving or necessary and conflicts of interest do exist. Consider the case of Gardasil, a vaccine against the human papillomavirus vaccine types 6, 11, 16, 18.

The Case of Gardasil

A few years ago, Merck aggressively marketed Gardasil, a vaccine against the HPV virus (which is linked to venereal warts and cervical cancer)–even in poor countries where cervical cancer is hardly a leading cause of death compared to malaria or diarrheal diseases. (In developed countries, a Pap test is as effective as a vaccine in preventing cervical cancer.)

Last year, judges in India’s Supreme Court demanded answers after children died during a trial of Gardasil and Cervarix, GlaxoSmithKline’s counterpart vaccine, a few years earlier.