SYNTHETIC
MULTIVITAMIN SALES GO THROUGH THE ROOF IN 2007
BUT DO WE REALLY NEED THEM?

The year’s sales figures are in: According to Nutrition Business
Journal, the dietary supplement market went from a $14 billion
industry in 1999 to a $22.4 billion industry in 2007. But
many nutrition experts are advising people to focus more on
their diet than on purchasing synthetic supplements. "With
some medical exceptions, there¹s no reason to take vitamins
if you have a decent diet,² says Pete Anderson, a lecturer
in nutritional sciences at UW-Madison. According to Dr. Chad
Oler, N.D., the only supplements worth taking are non-synthetic
supplements made from whole foods, since the purpose of a
supplement is to fill in gaps where the nutrition is not acquired
through food. ³Ninety-five to 98 percent of the stuff
over the counter is crapŠ they use cheap, raw materials
that are not bio-available, meaning that the body, even if
it can absorb it, cannot utilize the nutrients very well,²
he said. The general rule of thumb in distinguishing a truly
natural vitamin from a synthetic is that most synthetics advertise
highly inflated daily values of a given nutrient, which can
actually damage the body. Stick to a naturally occurring,
organic if possible multivitamin that has 100 percent of the
recommended daily intake or less. Learn more about this issue
in OCA’s "Nutri-con" campaign headquarters:
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